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File: 1604244380818.png (528.97 KB, 1920x1080, vgrs9gwyfncz[1].png)

 No.73

so, how does this organizing thing gonna actually work. Is this just gonna be a (bunkerchan.xyz), but anarkiddy version or is this gonna actually be a way to organize groups and share info?

Has anyone got a group started to kick things off or is this just spreading info stage right now. Is their anyway to kick things off?

 No.76

>>73
>anarkiddy version of bunkchan

That would be anokchan, if thats what you want.

 No.80

>>76
Damn for a second I was shocked that anokchan is still around but I see it's some kind of reboot. Their imageboard software is super weird.

 No.81

back to the main point how is this organizing hub thing going to work?

 No.82

that depends on you and everyone else in here. this board feels like more of a shitposting board but the other boards seem more oriented towards organizing

 No.87

>>81
Is that the premise of this site? Was there a mission statement somewhere? Or are you just basing that off the front page? (serious question)

 No.90

as far as i know there's no mission statement anywhere for this board in particular. but if you poke around readinhabit.com a while you might catch a bit of a picture.

imho this place feels like it could be valuable bc the noise of other platforms is just gone, and we can get to longer focused anonymous convos about specifics in a way that other boards or platforms aren't conducive to. but i'm just like thinking out loud here

 No.97

>>87
well inhabit.global suggest starting hubs and becoming more and more autonomous, i figured the boards were going to be setup to discuss a good startup point to get the ball rolling.

 No.109

>>76

didn't know that was a thing

 No.111

>>97
get on it anon

things take awhile to string together

 No.113

relax boomer, it for cp

 No.114

Very important guys: don't forget to vote! Vote like your life depends on it because it does!
-Z

 No.119

>>73
That's the plan. i think sharing info and lessons is good

The way I see it, people might find each other based on the some of same interests like farming and tech, and smaller conversations could happen from that. thats how hobby forums i've been in work maybe its the same

 No.120

>>80

yeah it sucks

 No.136

Big effort post here, sorry

Some good ideas is to find fellow travelers in the area (food not bombs, and other anarchist types) to kick off the first part of the hub. The first part, the base of the hub. Look to your local area what are the type of needs that are not being met. With the current pandemic and homelessness rise has caused a big strain on food banks and housing, and a good solution would be to acquire food on the cheap.

1. If possible find local farms and see if you can buy huge large scale food for the cheap, huge quantities of food get dumped for not meeting the standards set ( it sounds bad but the food is fine, just looks weird)
2. Grocery stores may have large stocks of food that are pushing on going bad and only have a few days of shelf life left. If you ask the local manager he might give you a good deal or just donate it if you say your with a food bank. Keep in mind you will have to cook and serve right away.

When serving or supplying food to your locals they will be more open to your ideas, Personally I don't press to hard just hand out leaflets with the food and spread idea's while getting new members.

 No.137

>>136

Skills
You can recommend new skills to teach other comrades while starting up, everyone has a skill set different from most people and being able to teach other to be more well rounded is specific area's and would be a good way to get more members, like a learn to farm class and then recommend the group. Obliviously you can use any skill computers, sowing, metalwork etc. And while teaching skills to be more independent.

start building autonomy
When you get a few people and have a growing hub. Start growing independence from the local state area, the more independence from the state and corporations the less you will have to rely on them the more free you are, if you don't have to slave away at job if you have food and a place to sleep. Once you have a solid base of needs met you can grow into other things as well.

If you have better idea's for starting hubs please in include. This is just some stuff off the top of my head.

 No.143

What do you want it to be, OP?

 No.145

>>136
>>137
This is good shit and I support using these efforts strategically, but I sincerely and constructively hope that people are considering how often these kinds of things (food distro, skill-sharing, attempting to replace state/capitalist institutions with self-produced alternatives) just wind up becoming either 1) less efficient versions of liberal-progressive charities, 2) worker co-ops, or 3) self-isolating communes.

 No.146

>>145
we should try going for the third option, without isolation part. Building community is another important part and getting hubs to work together will also important.

 No.150

File: 1604443347545.jpg (100.76 KB, 960x704, commaldduckmaybe.jpg)

>>146
this is the moment that community inspiring hubs can strike at the hearts of the growing swaths of disenchanted liberals.

 No.152

>>146
Yeah, that's the tricky thing, though. Building literal autonomy and self-sufficiency is great if it strengthens your ability to act and opens new possibilities, but it's not great if you're just putting a ton of effort into DIY shit for no reason and essentially being an off-grid homesteader, which I worry is often the case when a lot of people talk about communes.

As an example: growing food might reduce your reliance on the market and build camaraderie with other people who are into horticulture and/or free food, but trying to grow ALL of your own food will probably just take a ton of time and effort and resources with little additional benefit – unless you've got the land, equipment, and skill required to engage in serious farming.

I guess all I'm saying is that we'd all benefit from carefully assessing our positions, our strengths, and the possibilities that could be created by any given project, rather than just engaging in DIY projects for their own sake.

 No.155

>>152
you make a good point, autonomy may not need to be just full self reliance, but being able to get and provide resources in a way would be decent, but starting simple would be best. you probably dont need a commune space. But, we just need a space to organize and be able to address issues.

 No.162

>>152
some great points to keep in mind here. not every commune site / project needs to be focused on total self-sufficiency, but rather an organized withdrawal from complicity and reliance on global / national infrastructures and economy, by virtue of building real alternatives. The big farm for your local autonomus territory might be a commune down the road that knows their shit and has tractors; your little commune 15 miles down the road might fill in another piece of the puzzle that the farm relies on in turn.

"A local food distribution hub opens a cooperative grocery on the other side of town. Needing to expand capacity, the nearby farm that grows their vegetables integrates into a bioregional network looking to share a world as well as fresh food. A group of designers and engineers who hate their jobs team up to create an app that coordinates a flexible supply chain among the farms and distribution points. These efforts lead to an autonomous trade corridor springing up. The growth of the network’s force and the utter disregard for regulations leaves the authorities helpless, as food and people circulate freely along with the spirit of rebellion."

 No.163

>>162
but in order to start trade and a general system, we need to get this thing off the ground first.

 No.165

>>163
oh absolutely. just framing out the imaginary a bit for what non-isolated autonomies could look like and why complete self-reliance of atomized communes is explicitly not it.

what needs to happen first to get this thing off the ground in any of your dear opinions, anons?

 No.166

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>>163
>get this thing off the ground
>get this thing off the ground
>get this thing off the ground
Shut the fuck up anon.

 No.174

what are you on about anon

 No.182

>>152

It definitely seems worthwhile to establish communes that have "the land, equipment, and skill required to engage in serious farming" but also nobody is suggesting a vision of food autonomy that's about growing all one's own food or that a commune necessarily looks like a rural homestead. The suburbs seem ripe for communizing various spaces and aspects of life.

But also, just to say it, one person can easily plant fruit and nut trees which will produce more food than that person will eat for the rest of their life. Supposing the chestnuts live even a fraction of their 800 yrs, for example.

Nobody's suggesting we become peasants, you know?

 No.250

any updates on hub setup?

 No.251

File: 1606620965515.jpg (61.84 KB, 575x431, rammed_earth.jpg)

>>250
If you're looking for places to check out I got a few.

Co-op Jackson
>https://cooperationjackson.org/

Co-op Jackson is a beefy effort focused on building a solidarity economy in Jackson, Mississippi. They've been around for a bit and have alot to show for it. One cool thing about them is their community production, for instance they've been 3d printing masks for the Plague.

>https://cooperationjackson.org/announcementsblog/rbg90xmasktutorial


Here's a list of the co-ops they're currently workin on:
>https://cooperationjackson.org/prospective-coops

Carbondale Spring is a food autonomy focused project in Southern Illinois. Their biggest claim to fame is the gardens they work on scattered across the city. They grow food autonomously and give it out. One of their main bits is that they want defund the police to accomplish their initiatives. They also have a cooperative wing thats trying to get off the ground.

https://carbondalespring.org/

The city of Bloomington, Indiana has alot of cool shit going in it by all kinds of individuals, one project there is their housing co-op which is pretty mature and something to look into. In addition to that all kinds of municipal shit going on thats also worth a glance. You should give the city a visit.

Any other anons can feel free to add shit.

 No.252

>>163
>>165

Just go do it, and come back here to tell us about it. We aren't your mom, just go find places where you can get resources and start working from there and people will start to find your shit and reach out to you. If you can't do things on your own at least at a minor level of building your own autonomy with your local crew, I don't need to know you.

 No.284

>>136
Yeah this is solid advice. Also be sure to have rotating leadership roles if there are any at all. Skillshare and share all resources (including contacts).

 No.287

Put frankly I dunno what's the worse between Inhabit's shitty pompous talk of "Building the Commune" and other miserable Trots BULLSHIIIT… and the lame Mutual Aid memetic flat talk we got posted elsewhere. I know the former means something to you but it means something different to me, like, say, people getting snitched and/or badly beaten by Communard shitlords like Plast and Co. Among other pleasantries!

But sure, go on with your State-sanctioned co-ops for urbanite bitches btw. My bet is that everyone's gonna shit-talk each other after a while, but who knows? With the proper meds for relaxation and sub-cap money schemes maybe maybe.

 No.291

>>287

Care to tell your accusations clearly for people who don't know what you are talking about? Instead of just making vague gestures toward accusations of Plast and co? Claiming that they are snitches is a huge accusation, what's the story here?

 No.292

File: 1607660035012.gif (22.17 KB, 200x188, ad5643.gif)

>>287
>muh trotsky
>State-sanctioned co-ops for urbanite bitches
>People getting snitched and/or badly beaten

Anon I think you have the wrong kind of schizophrenia

 No.294

>>292
That poster is clearly a tardlet, but there is a kernel of a point here.

I think the point they were trying to make is that there is a lot of surface level crossover between this kind of "build and wait" mentality between more traditional modes of communism and the "build and wait" rhetoric of something like Inhabit. People here forget that the idea of building the party, getting out the word via protests/marches/meetings, and organizing resources is essentially what Communist Parties traditionally do as their main mode of organizing.

Here instead we have Inhabit, and what do they do? They do all the same things but claim that this isn't old fashioned communism, this is living anarchy here and now. But is it really? What does living anarchy actually mean when you reintroduce all this structure into it and do things that involve incorporating ourselves into more mainstream modes (like state sanctioned non-profits or permitted housing co-op structures that you find in college towns all over the place full of hippies).

Does this reincorporation of a non-revolutionary, non-radical mode, and building up farms and autonomy actually constitute a revolutionary act? Is farming actually doing anything or is it just a form of right-wing prepper culture but with a leftist spin this time instead? What we call building autonomy look a lot like prepping as though we are some cult that thinks the world is going to end tomorrow.

 No.295

>>294
Cont.

We combine a large number of weird ideas taken from various sources, but is this actually the right choice or have we simply come full circle from post-left all the way back around to normie-left? Of course this time it is as "hubs" that await the apocalypse while training and accumulating resources. I don't know it seems kinda weird to me, honestly, and I'm not sure this is how I want to use my time and resources.

The reason why I'm here is because I find these experiments in living and building interesting if nothing else. The problem is that the vignettes in books like inhabit about hacking drones and other things aren't actually real. If you go to these hubs IRL they are farming, prepping, participating in marches/protests that they would have been participating in anyway, and that is basically it. There is not anything more going on there. My critique is that everyone thought infoshops were a shit organizing model and shifted to no longer calling themselves anarchists, now they are tiqqunists, and instead of infoshops they have infohubs, instead of bookstores they have land projects. It is all the same shit with a new coat of paint. While I'm interested in the new coat of paint as an experiment, they don't really change anything fundamental about what we were doing. Instead of volunteering at the bookstore, I'm volunteering at the land project. Wow really showed em.

 No.301

>>287
Plast hits like a bitch like most communard shitlords

 No.305

>>301

I ain't worrying about this whimpy bitchy ass's punching power, must be a lil more than a mosquito. Commies irl are excessively self-important yet unsurprisingly frail and useless. Inferiority complex is all that can make them stand up from their computer armchair, lol

Personally don't know what's with getting beaten by this crowd as they're more likely to send another division after you, or their local gang of neonazi thugs….

 No.311

>>294
I think first and foremost its about the framing, interacting with the world directly vs interacting with it through an intermediary political program or w/e.

Also idk what you mean by "introducing structure". Nobody is doing that, but creating structures to accomplish goals doesn't make you not an anarchist. It's a really silly way to look at anarchism. But you can also go too far into the other direction and start basically, as you said, returning to base principles. The orangepill is appealing because it synthesizes that dichotomy of order and chaos, and invites anyone who feels so inclined to make their mark on the world, and take immediate steps to solve problems and build the world we would like to live in.

 No.321

>>311

The problem I have with orangepill is that sentence you just said, and many in orangepill land are so bland politically that anyone can agree with them.

" it synthesizes that dichotomy of order and chaos, and invites anyone who feels so inclined to make their mark on the world, and take immediate steps to solve problems and build the world we would like to live in."

I could say this to literally anyone, progressive, liberal, leftist, rightwing, acc/nrx, whatever, etc. Nobody is going to argue against this general sentiment, and they are all going to claim that the set of actions or political project they are participating in is them doing this.

 No.323

>>321
I pretty much agree with the sentiment that orangepill is a little bit too much on the side of vague to point of appealing to an unintended audience. The vignettes in inhabit.global endulge in lefitst fantasy too much and don't address alienation and the drives that keep us inactive. The instructions they offer can just as easily lead groups of people into neo-feudalism, especially without stating principles or critiques clearly. For the anarchists, there really isn't anything explicitly Anarchist about inhabit. The message is "you already are thinking this, so are others, just Do It" when the truth is farther from that, we have unbridgable strategic differences, and ethical commitments and we should lean into those differences and realize that there is no common front against the existent but we all each have the tools for attack. I agree that inhabit is basically post-left anarchy coming around full-circle back into ordinary leftism–with an eco-socialist/communalist/back-to-lander twist.
What brought me here was the possibility that this could be a new entrypoint for people out of leftism and liberalism into anarchistic ways of thinking, but it is mostly a circlejerk for left and left-adjacent, armchair utopians and engineers.

 No.324

>>323
Well the funny thing is that I don't think it is actually that armchair, but that people who are doing normal left/antifa/anarchist organizing and infoshop-type social centres in the US that have recently adopted this kind of quasi-tiqqunist sentiment don't rep it at all or signal outwardly. There are a lot of explicitly tiqqunist people in private working on big projects that don't really signal it because they are afraid.

This is a key problem with inhabit as a project, there are people, there are hubs, and you could go see them. But people are scared of putting themselves out there and these hubs in practice are mostly just reformulations of the infoshop and social centre dynamics you would find on the slingshot listing.

 No.325

>>324

I too saw this as potentially an entrypoint for people coming out of leftism but a text of fluff alone can't be an entrypoint. It has to have physical presence to go with it that people can participate in. Instead all these social centres are larping like "nothing going on here guys just a normal non-profit. Anarchist? hehe nooo we don't call ourselves anarchist, hehe ;) ;)" playing this stupid game instead of being inviting and affirming themselves as hubs in a way that people can engage with.

They aren't fooling the police or anyone that wishes them harm, and normie people in these places that engage with them for even 10 minutes will understand they are not at all like a normal community center. This "oh we are just normal" doesn't fool anyone except the people who are interested in engaging with hubs! Those people on the other hand get a whiff of activist-nonprofit and instantly disengage. It is literally a worst of both worlds where you aren't adequately repelling the people you want to keep off your backs, but you are doing just enough to repel the curious fellow-travellers who hate leftism.

 No.333

>>324
>>325
I know these posts are almost a week old by now, but I'm curious what
>putting themselves out there
and
>being inviting and affirming themselves as hubs
might look like in practice.

 No.341

>>333
I'm the thread OP. I was more asking how would one get started setting up a hub. How would the hubs network together. The inhabit book doesn't really go into detail with actual organizing, but rather just a bunch of vague shits fucked and we need to fix it without the state. I was also wondering if anyone else was actually organizing anything.

 No.342

>>341
This is the core of the problem. There are actual hubs, there are actual organizers, and there is a lot of accumulated experience. There is no entry funnel for people who are interested to plug into this, it is all gatekept to the point that people barely understand that it exists. I understand wanting privacy or whatever, but if your stated goal is that you want growth of hubs, there has to be some open ended, easily accessible discovery mechanism through which the knowledge of how to grow and build is propagated. Instead we have to complete opposite, like I said most people don't even know if hubs exist.

 No.344

>>333 nice trips

 No.346

>>342
I guess this is what I'm wondering: what might an entry funnel or discovery mechanism look like? I completely agree with your premise and it's a problem I've wanted to address for a long time.

Let's say, for example, there's a "social center" in a major metropolitan area that hosts weekly potlucks and reading groups. The core organizers of this project would conceive of it as a hub, and are personally connected with other projects doing similar things, and are generally involved with "Path B"-type activities. However, the public-facing image they try to present is just a kind of innocuous radical/progressive community event space, and there isn't necessarily a direct path from the public events to the more involved activities happening behind the scenes (other than getting to know the core organizers better and eventually getting invited to non-public stuff).

How could this project better allow for interested individuals to identify it for what it really is and get involved? (Rather than, as mentioned before, presenting an activist-nonprofit facade that fools nobody except the people they actually want to attract.)

 No.350

>>346
Here is a good guide for starting a group in your area by neighborhood anarchists.
https://neighborhoodanarchists.org/how-to-start-a-successful-group

 No.352

>>346
an incredibly easy thing that requires no effort at all would just be putting up some kind of public inhabit listing. for over a decade now everyone was walking around with the slingshot 'radical contact list' in their back pocket and it hasn't caused anyone problems really (other than the occasional oogle).

https://slingshotcollective.org/radical-contact-list/

something so basic, that designates "This non-profit/social centre/bookstore/whatever in this city, has at least some interesting people involved in the project who thought to have it put on this list", but for inhabit or related tiqqunist projects. These hubs are already doing great work to bring in randos from their local neighborhood community and build up those kinds of ties, so I don't think there is anything that could be done much better on that front, a lot of these places have continuous churn/circulation in that localized sense. Even a low-key flag like this though could easily bring in a ton of outside circulation over several years. If even a few of the people engaging with the text in isolation/online turn out to be skilled with high energy it would be worth it.

Another thing to note if you are scared of this idea: That slingshot listing link HAS SEVERAL HUBS ON IT! If they aren't afraid to identify their project as "radical" why not identify as "hub"? Also, if being placed on a public listing would significantly undermine your entire project, that says a lot about the viability of the project in general.

 No.353

>>352
Cont.

There is no way that I would in a million years identify the (to give an example) "Community Arts & Media Project" from that slingshot listing as anything more than a bland community arts centre of which there are 100s in any given city. The fact that this one in particular was placed on that listing though, allows me to understand that I might run into interesting people at this one in particular.

The way the inhabit text is structured (to use an analogy): We are building churches, they follow these principles and ethos that we have laid out in our text, we hope to find new members and grow our church body! Build out your own church and join our eternal struggle young folks!

People: We have read the way, where shall we go to congregate with other believers?! Where shall we direct our energies?

*Silence* or we tell them, start by building your own church from scratch! good luck!
If churches operated how we do, they would die.

 No.359

>>352
I think you'll really strike gold if you dont just limit this to those necessarily espousing orange aesthetics

 No.360

>>359

Obviously, orange aesthetic folks are the extreme minority if we only engaged with them we would have almost nobody. I just wish they had more presence like every other type of project does.



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