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File: 1604345518767.jpg (1.12 MB, 2560x1440, 20181103_145528.jpg)

 No.21[Reply]

Got any good ideas on what to start encouraging/promoting for a hearty protein source in the midwest? Nuts? Lots of Nuts?
6 posts omitted. Click reply to view.

 No.53

>>52
^^^

 No.54

>>52
please feel free that sounds great, what is this

 No.55

>>52
Civilisation ain't the problem, mate, unless you're defining any group of people with an organizing ethos a "civilisation."

 No.56

>>55
Tf is "organizing ethos" supposed to mean
Civilization is

 No.57

>>56
primmie can't into computer



File: 1604254519382.jpg (442.11 KB, 1409x1409, the good shit.jpg)

 No.16[Reply]

what are you gonna drink in the morning once climate change has destroyed coffee production and it costs $50/bag?

pic related
6 posts and 1 image reply omitted. Click reply to view.

 No.36

File: 1604704215889.jpg (66.39 KB, 600x600, bay_seeds_grande.jpg)

On the West coast, the nuts of the Bay Laurel are a really nice for a coffee-like beverage. Collect them in the early Fall, dry and roast them, grind the meats into a powder. Pretty high caffeine content too, with yerba mate (yaupon relative) has curbed my need for getting coffee recently.

 No.37

>>36
This is really interesting, I had no idea the fruits of California bay laurel were even edible! Though it sounds like the caffeine thing might actually be a myth?

https://www.facebook.com/bluewindschool/posts/have-you-ever-heard-that-california-bay-nuts-actually-seeds-contain-caffeine-or-/10153936234133806/

 No.38

>>37
At the very least, they have some good nutritional value and high fat content.
Thanks for the fact check!

 No.39

>>37
Non-pozzed version of that link for the gamers

https://archive.is/lOOUm

Yaupon was a kind of a large underground plant meme when I lived below the mason-dixen.
Never tried the drink though, is it any good?

 No.40

>>39
I've only had it from one source, but it's pretty decent IMO. If you brew it like a tea, it tastes a lot like yerba mate. You can also brew it by simmering it for 5 minutes, which weirdly (in my experience) mellows the flavor but makes it a lot darker and fuller-bodied, which is nice if you're actually going for a coffee replacement vibe.



File: 1604068851519.png (509.6 KB, 640x1136, 6A745E97-8572-4153-A5CC-93….png)

 No.2[Reply]

I really want to know about chestnut trees
1 post omitted. Click reply to view.

 No.10


 No.11

>>10
this should be in the sticky tbh

 No.13

just read this guy's twitter

https://twitter.com/buildsoil

 No.14

>>13
glad to see this guy is widely known

 No.19

File: 1604300657212.jpeg (911.23 KB, 1536x2048, image.jpeg)

>>11 +1! I wonder if he would come chat here. i bet yes. his twitter is a fucking encyclopedia at this point tho



File: 1604089711198.jpeg (236.15 KB, 1400x874, raingarden.jpeg)

 No.4[Reply]

wondering what insights, experiences, resources people might have re: arid lands. Going to dump some books I've found helpful below.

(pic related is first - Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands & Beyond by Brad Lancaster)

 No.5

File: 1604090833321.jpeg (120.46 KB, 584x778, pdm.jpeg)

Permaculture: a Designer's Manual

about 1/5 of this tome is a section on various strategies for deserts, whether they're arid grasslands, dune fields, or rocky expanses. Most of the rest (pattern understanding, climate, etc.) can be applied directly to any place, and elements of the temperate, cold, and tropical sections can also be mined for information useful to our ends. just a good one to have in your toolkit for anybody!

 No.6

File: 1604091112450.jpeg (171.79 KB, 1000x1603, sowingseeds.jpeg)

Sowing Seeds in the Desert

Fukuoka puts forward a provocative vision of an accelerated dispersal of species worldwide - suggesting that the best way to "repair" the runaway effects of anthropogenic disturbance and desertification would be to encourage "invasives" to naturalize, even when they outcompete native species

 No.7

Land is arid for a reason

Time to go back to munke

 No.8

Land is arid for a reason

Time to go back to munke

 No.9

File: 1604097620258.jpeg (59.15 KB, 440x630, hotdry.jpeg)

a really accessible tour of some of the planet's most effective technologies for growing food in drylands, and the cultures they emerged with



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